Monthly Archives: March 2015

Ube, Japan Museum Installation

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Article on the exhibition in Ube newspaper.

 

Hammond EH Star Article1

An article in the East Hampton Star on the exhibition in Japan.

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Phyllis Hammond with winning sculpture, “Redefining Space” in Ube, Japan.

Ube, Japan Museum Installation

Mr Sasaki and Andrea

Akira Sasaki and his daughter Andrea Sasaki with my sculpture in process. Both are architects. They were immensely helpful during the fabrication of my sculpture.

1.Redefining Space Steel Steel Paint H10ftx 44FT 2009 - $50,000

“Redefining Space” on permanent display in the Tokaiwa Park Sculpture Garden.

 

 

In 2009 I won an award in the Ube Tokiwa Museum’s 23rd International Biennale sculpture competition.

Ube was one of the first Japanese cities bombed in WWII. It had been the site of a large chemical plant. The city was totally demolished, and a lake was created where the chemical plant had been. During the rehabilitation period after WWII, the citizens of Ube created a campaign to beautify the area with greenery and flowers. The Tokiwa Museum was opened in 1961. A huge sculpture park around the lake was eventually created, and in 1963 the first Biennale was held.  Originally known as the “Ube Exhibition of Outdoor Sculpture”, it was the very first large-scale sculpture exhibition ever held in Japan.

The award I received included travel costs,  the cost of fabricating the sculpture,  and a cash prize.  I had built a 15″ aluminum model of the sculpture and traveled to Ube in 2009 to oversee the construction of the full scale piece in steel, which is 12′ x 9′ x 9′. When I arrived, I was greeted with polite shock by the museum officials, who had assumed until they set eyes on me that I was male. In the group of 39 artists selected for the show, I was the only woman. I later learned that among the many hundreds of artists included in the whole 23 year history of the show, I was one of exactly three women.

 

March 25th, 2015|Current Post, Ube Museum Installation, Women In Art|

The Will Award

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THE 2001 SHAKESPEARE WILL AWARDS

 

In 1988 I won an invitational competition to be the designer of the William Shakespeare Award for Classical Theatre, nicknamed “The Will Award”.
My bronze sculpture was awarded by The Shakespeare Theatre in Washington, DC for 20 years, from 1988 to 2008. The list of honorees includes Ralph Fiennes, Anthony Hopkins, Dame Maggie Smith, Hal Holbrook, Patrick Stewart, Sam Waterson, Lynn Redgrave, Christopher Walken, Morgan Freeman, Mel Gibson, Kenneth Branagh, Christopher Plummer, Kevin Kline,  and Joseph Papp. I had the pleasure of attending the award ceremony every year, on Shakespeare’s birthday. Always an elaborate event, the gala was a colorful swirl of guests mingling with distinguished classical actors  dressed in Elizabethan costume. As was the custom in Shakespeare’s day, when female roles were portrayed by male performers, a number of the actors in female costume were men.

Every year the gala raises hundreds of thousands of dollars to support the Theatre’s education and outreach programs that serve over 20,000 public school students annually.

My sculpture shows faces within faces, unfolding like leaves from a tree or peelings from an onion. It is also reminiscent of the open pages of a book. I was awarded this opportunity because the jury panel found my sculpture to be a visual expression of the ambiguity and multiple layers that mark many of Shakespeare’s characters.

 

March 18th, 2015|Current Post, The Will Awards|

The Phoenix Project

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“Phoenix”, commissioned by the state of Connecticut and the Connecticut
Commission On The Arts in 1992.
It stands in front of the Department for Environmental Protection building
in Hartford.

 

Visions and Revisions Bronze 1992

 

 

 

4. Vision Revisions

 

3.Hartford Phoenix2 Gatekeepers 1992 Bronze

March 11th, 2015|Awards & Accolades, Current Post|

Remembering William King

Bill King

Words like “awesome” come to mind when thinking of sculptor William King. I’ll always be grateful for the brief time I had to talk to him the day before he died. What an overwhelming experience. His mind was so clear. He had just turned 90. Of course his main concern was his beloved wife, artist Connie Fox​. For the last three years, he used my studio to cut out some of his metal forms. I am thankful for having had the opportunity to be around his great creative spirit.

March 11th, 2015|Current Post, The Studio|

Pratt Institute Collection

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My sculpture in the Pratt Institute collection was selected by David Weinrib, curator of the Pratt Sculpture Park, which was recognized as one of the 10 best college and university campus art collections in the country by Public Art Review in 2006. The composite image appeared on the cover of the Pratt Sculpture Park catalog.

Here’s the caption that appears under my piece on the Pratt Sculpture Park’s website:  “Phyllis Baker Hammond has explored the possibilities of laser cutting to create lace-like dimensional aluminum panels.”

 

 

 

March 4th, 2015|Awards & Accolades, Current Post|