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The Phoenix Project

phoenix

 

“Phoenix”, commissioned by the state of Connecticut and the Connecticut
Commission On The Arts in 1992.
It stands in front of the Department for Environmental Protection building
in Hartford.

 

Visions and Revisions Bronze 1992

 

 

 

4. Vision Revisions

 

3.Hartford Phoenix2 Gatekeepers 1992 Bronze

March 11th, 2015|Awards & Accolades, Current Post|

Remembering William King

Bill King

Words like “awesome” come to mind when thinking of sculptor William King. I’ll always be grateful for the brief time I had to talk to him the day before he died. What an overwhelming experience. His mind was so clear. He had just turned 90. Of course his main concern was his beloved wife, artist Connie Fox​. For the last three years, he used my studio to cut out some of his metal forms. I am thankful for having had the opportunity to be around his great creative spirit.

March 11th, 2015|Current Post, The Studio|

Pratt Institute Collection

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My sculpture in the Pratt Institute collection was selected by David Weinrib, curator of the Pratt Sculpture Park, which was recognized as one of the 10 best college and university campus art collections in the country by Public Art Review in 2006. The composite image appeared on the cover of the Pratt Sculpture Park catalog.

Here’s the caption that appears under my piece on the Pratt Sculpture Park’s website:  “Phyllis Baker Hammond has explored the possibilities of laser cutting to create lace-like dimensional aluminum panels.”

 

 

 

March 4th, 2015|Awards & Accolades, Current Post|

Aluminum Wall Forms

The wall forms start with scribbled lines or doodling,  rather like a happening, totally unexpected.

Doodles or small drawings are scanned into the computer, converted from a pixel to a vector program, and then cut by laser or waterjet from a piece of 4′ x 8′ aluminum….the sculpture is what’s left after it is cut out, converting from positive to negative space. It has a life of its own.

Colored lighting is added to complete the wall structures. When the room lighting is set correctly, shadows add a new dimension to the work.

 

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panels

"IN AND OUT" with lighting

 

 

1Panels2012_gjm7958

February 25th, 2015|Current Post, The Studio|

My Earliest Memories of Art

UnfurlingBlkThe seeds  were planted early. My first working space was a closet. To my five year old eyes it seemed large. I had a shelf-type table across the back of the closet that I used as a desk. There was an overhead light. I did my first drawings from memory, drawings I thought were terrible and distorted compared to what people really looked like. I abandoned that mode of work, copied comic strips and cartoons.

When I was in second grade mom sent me to oil-painting lessons on Saturdays. The teacher put emphasis on how to copy paintings by making a grid.

My mother sent me with pictures to copy: a photo of my grandfather, someone else’s drawing of a Scottie dog like the one we owned.
I liked to draw small doodles, imagining land contours, ends connecting to the water edges like maps. I made carvings in ivory soap, and figures I built in snow thrilled the neighbors. A pastel drawing of a fish made in 5th grade was stolen by a classmate, which I took as a symbol of success.

In the 6th grade I journeyed to the Boston Museum on Saturdays, by myself, for a drawing class. It was a one hour train ride to Bay Back station, then two subway changes to reach Huntington Avenue. Miles from home, I sat looking at plaster statues of  classical Roman or Greek figures in a huge freezing room. Trying every week to make my pencil replicate what I was seeing, I felt like a speck overwhelmed by the space and scale.